Opioid Addiction Treatment and Litigation

By Mark Astor 4 months agoNo Comments

Good afternoon, everyone. I hope you all had a great weekend. It’s always fun to come back to work on a Monday. I find that, as much as I try to relax on the weekends, the nature of our business doesn’t allow for that. I never complain because it’s a labor of love to help people.
 
I want to address a couple of comments that were made with regards to my last video. It had to do with the fact that, of the $54 million that’s coming into the state of Florida as a result of the state of emergency declared by the governor, apparently, we’re only getting $400,000 here in Palm Beach County. Of that money, it’s apparently being used for medically assisted treatment. I got a little blow back from folks who said, “There’s evidence that this stuff works.”
 
I’m no therapist. I’m not a scientist. I only know what I see in my practice. What I see is individuals from the ages of 18 to 30 who are addicted to drugs as a result of opioids that have been prescribed to them by doctors who are pushed, prodded and incentivized by pharmaceutical companies. They give kids opioids when they probably don’t need them. That’s what irritates me. The fact that we’re going to give more money to the pharmaceutical companies to fix a problem that they, in large part, caused rubs me the wrong way. Statistics or no statistics. I have a problem with that. If we can use some type of medically assisted treatment to get people off drugs and ultimately into some type of abstinence based treatment, I’m all for that conversation. If you’re going to tell me that we’re going to take one opioid and swap it in for another one, I have a problem with that. I think a lot of other people do, too.
 
There was an interesting 60 Minutes piece on the TV last night. It was a follow up to the 60 Minutes piece they had done a couple of weeks ago that talked about the fact that our federal government has wimped out when it comes to going after the big pharmaceutical companies that are peddling these drugs to our kids and whoever else is being prescribed them.
 
The first show talked about the fact that the DEA has had their hands tied. Yesterday’s show talked about the fact that they haven’t had the stones to take these guys to court. One of the companies they specifically talked about was McKesson. I don’t have a problem talking about it because the whole country heard about McKesson last night.
They made about $200 billion last year as a result of selling pharmaceuticals. They got a whopping $150 million fine. I haven’t done the math, but I bet it doesn’t take a lot of time for them to make $150 million. Seeing as how no one is going to jail, being indicted or prosecuted, I don’t suppose they care much about the fact that they’re getting a slap on the wrist.
 
My practice is focused on helping individuals in crisis because of addiction and mental illness. I lay a large part of that blame on the fact that we as a society have had these drugs rammed down our throats. One of the reasons that I got involved in the opioid litigation is to help families that have suffered, whose kids have overdosed, and have lost kids as a result of this. I don’t apologize for that.
If you know anyone who has a child who was prescribed an opioid and has since overdosed, or worse, has died, I want you to give us a call. Ask to speak to the opioid litigation team. We can help people. The only way to fight back is to punish the pharmaceutical companies. I know that money doesn’t bring a loved one back, but it gets a little justice for the family. That’s ultimately what it’s all about.
 
I always appreciate the comments. I love the comments that challenge me intellectually. For the folks who post things on Facebook disagreeing with what I said, keep it coming. I always enjoy an intellectual conversation. If you know a family that is in crisis and needs help, have them give us a call. Thank you.

Categories:
  Addiction, Litigation, mental health, Opioids, substance abuse
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